Canard Community Forum  

Go Back   Canard Community Forum > New Member Introductions
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-16-2007, 01:22 AM
DWalker DWalker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 5
Default Hello all

I guess to begin, my name is Don Walker and I live in the Denver Colorado area. I own a performance automotive shop mostly specializing in turbocharging and fabrication. I have spent my adult life working for various race shops and teams in club and professional road racing. mostly with Porsches. The downside to this is I never have had the time to get into flying, not even enough to get my pilots license, which I have literally wanted to do since before I was a teenager and flew RC and model planes. I also always wanted to build my own plane and I had a subscription to Kitplanes as far back as 1984/85 when I was in Jr high!
Back then, I dreamed of a high-performance 2-seater, and contemplated the midget Mustang. After deciding that I didnt really want to spend a small fortune constucting a metal plane, I re-evaulated and fixed on the KR-2, joining thier mailing list in about 99. I had looked into various canards- the e-racer (mostly because I have had a fair amount ot experience with the land-rover v8 Dickey was using for power) the dragonfly and Quickies, and the various EZ's, as well.
I have pretty much settled on a Cozy MK4 using a turbo Mazda rotary as I feel this gives me the best bang-for-buck using my available skills and resources. I read John Slades page from front to back, including all the flight test notes and summaries, and found this forum through it. His experinces have convinced me that it will fit my wants for a stable, reliable and fairly long-range aircraft that I can build, maintain, and fly.
My current plans are to:
>Join the glider club with my wife and introduce her to aviation while working towards the private pilots lic I should have buckled down and gotten in high school.

>Get the plans and parts for the MK4 going, or MAYBE find a started project and shortcut the process a bit. With my work schedule construction is sure to go in spurts, but I do have the "luxury" of having a pretty well equipped fabrication shop in which to work, complete with paint booth(large enough to do an airframe and wings) and several minions to help sand, lift, hold, and other menial tasks.

If someone in the community knows of a started project that might be for sale, I am certianly interested!

Cheers,
Don
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-16-2007, 08:26 AM
Jerry Schneider Jerry Schneider is offline
Cozy #768
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Tampa
Posts: 223
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWalker View Post
If someone in the community knows of a started project that might be for sale, I am certianly interested!
Don,
Look here!: http://tinyurl.com/2nls4e
__________________
"I run with scissors."
Cozy Plans #768
http://home.earthlink.net/~jerskip
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-16-2007, 09:03 AM
John Slade's Avatar
John Slade John Slade is offline
Flying TurboRotaryCozyIV
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: KWST
Posts: 3,836
Default

Welcome Don,
I'm glad you found my site useful.

Although gliding is an interesting sport, I'm not sure I'd recommend doing it while working toward a license for powered aircraft. The two are quite different and the habits ingrained in one will work adversely in the other. When undergoing pilot training in the RAF my instructor insisted that I stop going to the glider school at weekends because he said it would have a negative impact on my training. Nylon underwear was also banned.... but thats whole other story.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-16-2007, 09:31 AM
DWalker DWalker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 5
Default

Jerry- Thanks for the link! I will definitely enquire about it.

John- Thats interesting regarding the glider training. Several "older" instructors have told me they think its a great idea to do gliders as a sort of primer to get a feel for how aircraft work. This could be a bit skewed however as they are the same fellows who seem to think the current New Piper Warriors and the newer Cessnas most people take instruction in are maybe too easy to fly.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-16-2007, 09:53 AM
Dust's Avatar
Dust Dust is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Troy, Michigan
Posts: 7,963
Default

Welcome aboard -

glider, LSA, certificated all work, make sure you like flying, then dive on in
__________________
Enjoy the build,njut av byggandet, godere il costruire, nyd bygningen, geniesse den Bau, apolafse tin kataskevi, disfrute la construcción, curta a construção, Pidä hauskaa rakentamisen parissa, bouw lekker,uživaj grade?inaslajdaites postroikoi, geniet die bou
dust

maker of wood, fiberglass, foam dust, metal bits and one day a Cozy will pop out and swiftly whisk me from meeting old friends and family to adventures throughout the world
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-16-2007, 10:42 AM
dpaton's Avatar
dpaton dpaton is offline
Future Cozy Driver
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Streamwood, Iiilnois
Posts: 259
Default

When you're serious about acquiring a project, contact Beagle, aka the CanardFinder. He maintains the best list I'm aware of of interested buyers and potential sellers. He has a process for matching them, and a small finder's fee, but in dealing with him over the years (I still haven't bought anything) he's really really good at what he does, and worth the time investment.

http://canardfinder.com/
__________________
This is not a sig. This is a duck. Quack.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-16-2007, 11:20 AM
Marc Zeitlin Marc Zeitlin is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Tehachapi, CA 93561
Posts: 1,083
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Slade View Post
Although gliding is an interesting sport, I'm not sure I'd recommend doing it while working toward a license for powered aircraft....
I disagree completely. I think that EVERY power pilot should HAVE to get a glider rating before stepping foot into a powered aircraft. First, learn to FLY, then learn what to do with an engine. I learned in gliders first, then moved to power. I think I'm a better pilot for it, and I think that during my prop loss episode, being a glider pilot assisted in giving me confidence and ability to deal with the situation. Most power pilots are petrified of the engine quitting - glider pilots are not, and know what to do.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-16-2007, 12:27 PM
DWalker DWalker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 5
Default

I guess I should clarify a bit. I have always loved flying, and really should have gone ahead and gotten my pilots sert way back in high school when I had the free time and could have scraped up the money. I went racing instead. Now that I might actually have some "free time" again in life I can get on with it! While in college I managed a few lessons, worked at the local airport doing interiors/upholstery(mostly Barons, 414's, etc) and tried to get up as often as I could with friends who were in the flight program at my school.
My wife on the other hand, has never even thought about flying, but is interested in it at least. My thoughts are that gliders are a little less intimidating( less knobs, switches, etc to deal with) for her to get a feel for flying and then start pp lessons.

As far as building goes, I have a lot of "nervous energy" and have to stay busy. For years I have built race and street cars not only as a career but also as a hobby. Lately I have been wanting to do something a little different, and in a way I have spent my life aquiring the skillsets I need to make this happen. My plan/goal is to spend the next year getting my cert, putting in some flight time, and gathering materials or finding a started project. Within 3 years I hope to have the aircraft fairly complete and my shop able to run daily without me having to be there, allowing me to devote more of my time to finishing it out and do some flying to put hours in the book.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-16-2007, 01:02 PM
John Slade's Avatar
John Slade John Slade is offline
Flying TurboRotaryCozyIV
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: KWST
Posts: 3,836
Default

Quote:
disagree completely. I think that EVERY power pilot should HAVE to get a glider rating before stepping foot into a powered aircraft. First, learn to FLY, then learn what to do with an engine.
Actually we're in total agreement. Gliding is an excellent precursor to powered flight - what I was trying to say was - dont try to learn them both at the same time.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-20-2007, 10:09 AM
Clutch Cargo's Avatar
Clutch Cargo Clutch Cargo is offline
w/ Spinner and Paddlefoot
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Cape Coral, FL
Posts: 602
Lightbulb yes or no...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Zeitlin View Post
I disagree completely. I think that EVERY power pilot should HAVE to get a glider rating before stepping foot into a powered aircraft. First, learn to FLY, then learn what to do with an engine. I learned in gliders first, then moved to power. I think I'm a better pilot for it, and I think that during my prop loss episode, being a glider pilot assisted in giving me confidence and ability to deal with the situation. Most power pilots are petrified of the engine quitting - glider pilots are not, and know what to do.
I would agree on learning to fly first and the advantages glider training gives, but I would have to say that any pilot should spend a good deal of time in the aircraft (he was flying most of the time) learning how to deal with lost power situations. My instructor was a fanatic about it, and we caused many a farmer to tighten his buttocks as we came almost down to the ground over and over again in the countryside of Brownsburg Indiana till he was satisfied I could do it in my sleep! To this day when an engine sputters or some other crazy thing happens (like the power goes out at night) I can still hear him "What do you do? What do you do?" I'd say: "FLY THE AIRPLANE!!"

Right. I don't even have to think about it. It's automatic.
__________________
Plans #618, a tub, and everything I need to go to chapter 11 except: TIME! and a cold beer

"I'll do the "thinnin'" around here, Bobba Looey" ! - Quicksdraw McGraw
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-20-2007, 11:09 AM
TMann's Avatar
TMann TMann is offline
Got Foam?
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 756
Default

when I did my first dead-stick landing, I was amazed at how easy it was but then someone pointed out to me that I had already made 265 dead-stick landings. Each time you land a square (para-foil) parachute you sharpen these skills........however, as beneficial as that training/experience, it's not something I would consider essential in order to become a proficient pilot.
__________________
T Mann - Loooong-EZ/20B Infinity R/G Chpt 10 N200LZ
Got Foam?
Mann's Airplane Factory
We add rocket's to everything!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.