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  #16  
Old 04-20-2006, 12:40 PM
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mplafleur mplafleur is offline
Finally at Chapter 4!
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne Hicks
Is now a good time for a shameless plug?
New Noze Skid.
When's the real test coming?
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  #17  
Old 04-20-2006, 01:12 PM
Wayne Hicks Wayne Hicks is offline
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The noze skid design I'm using is not new. It's been used in some form or fashion by others. It's been inadvertently tested quite a few times. One individual in particular landed on his skid plate three times before having to change it out.

I'll stand on these past tests. I don't plan on testing mine!
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  #18  
Old 04-20-2006, 09:26 PM
Richard Riley Richard Riley is offline
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I posted this in Rec.Aviation.Homebuilt in 1998

-------------

Some folks have been asking why I didn’t make it to Copperstate. This is on
the longish side, but here it goes.

It started just over a year ago, on my way back from Oshkosh ‘97. We were
just out of bankruptcy, didn’t have a nickel in the bank, so we’d decided not
to have a booth. We just went to Oshkosh, took Misha’s 540 Berkut and
John Danials’ 360, went to forums, walked the exhibit halls and had a
blast. John left early, Monday morning, for Jackson Hole, Wy.


We got a call that night - he’d had an electrical failure. No damage, but we
needed to fly Jackson Hole to check it out on our way to LA. It turned out to be nothing, but while we were working on his plane a very pretty brunet drove up in a red Le Barron.

A blond man stepped out of the passenger’s side. "Hey! Like your
airplanes!"

We recognized him. You couldn’t miss him, even without glasses, and his hair
longer than in his heyday. "Thanks! Like your music!" John Denver walked
over to us.

We’d heard from the local avionics shop that Denver was looking for a
nice Long EZ to buy, so he could commute from Aspen to Los Angeles,
to the Bay where his son was. He poured over the Berkuts on the ramp,
replying with an involuntary "far out!" after every spec we rattled off. We
offered him a flight, he was clearly tempted but begged off. He had a
charity fund raiser in the next town he had to get to. He took our cards
and told us he’d call the next time he was in LA.

We didn’t hear from him. He found an EZ to buy, a fast one with all the
bells and whistles. I found his autobiography remaindered at Crown and
bought it for $3 - a first edition. I don’t think there was a second edition.
I thought if he owned and EZ, sooner or later I’d get the chance to
ask him to autograph it. Then, something strange. My girlfriend and I are
invited to dinner by an old friend of hers, Hellen Stapenhorst. On their
bookshelf, the same book - "Take me Home." Autographed, with a very personal inscription.

Steve Stapenhorst, Hellen’s husband, was a 60’s folk singer who sang with
John Denver hundreds of times. He suggested that Denver record "Thank
God I’m a Country Boy." I told him about our meeting, and John’s
airplane, we marveled at the decreasing size of the earth.

The next weekend I was driving to my Girlfriend’s on Sunday night.
There was a news report that an ultralight airplane owned by John Denver
had crashed, but Denver himself was in Aspen. I called around, the
consensus was that Denver’s plane wasn’t out of the paint shop yet.

Monday morning I drove into work and heard on the radio that he’d been
flying the airplane when it went down in Monterey bay. An EZ, Denver had been identified from fingerprints. I called Mike, my office manager, from the car to let him know. He knew. "Hard Copy" was waiting for me. We were still listed in the LA phone book as "Experimental Aviation, Inc." and suddenly every news organization in LA was calling us for quotes and footage.

Mike and I were alone in the building that week. Dave was in the Philippines
with Misha, working with a customer on his Berkut, we were pretty much closed that week. So instead of putting Dave, the real expert, on camera, I got my 15 minutes of fame. CBS, NBC, ABC, the local affiliates, 3 local independents, Time, Newsweek, CNN, The Economist That night I was on three different LA stations simultaneously. For the truly adventurous reporters, who wanted to see what it was like to fly an EZ first hand, I made contact with Maj. Norm Howell, TPS instructor and EZ pilot. He made it on another 6 outlets, including 4 networks. Between us, and a few other EZ pilots scattered across the country, we got the message out - the EZ is a safe plane, with a record as good or better than any Cessna, or motorcycle. It worked. The only "hit" piece was the one that didn’t use footage shot with Norm or me. Hard Copy’s "Scarecraft." But it was short, and lame, and ignored.

There were mistakes. Bryant Gumbal, on "Public Eye," called the airplane an
"EZ Long." The Today show did a piece on accident rates among experimental airplanes and included footage of Charlie Hillard’s Sea Fury nosing over at Lakeland - I was in the office when the cut it into the story and tried my hardest to convince them to leave it out, to no avail. But Time got the story exactly, excruciatingly right. I called the writer there to thank him.

Time passed, the story faded off the front page. Fewer and fewer people asked "Is that the kind of airplane John Denver was flying?" when we went to
airshows.
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  #19  
Old 04-20-2006, 09:28 PM
Richard Riley Richard Riley is offline
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Quote:
Continued

Then a month ago Steve was playing a little coffeehouse in Pasadena. The
audience was largely invited, old time folksong fans and friends. My
girlfriend and I sat down, at our table was an older woman with a stack of handouts for a John Denver remembrance. A beach-clean up walk, a tree planting, sing alongs and a silent, candlelight vigil at 5:28 on Oct 12, the one year anniversary of the crash.

I had a Berkut jacket on.

After the show the conversation turned to Denver’s crash, what caused it, did he suffer. People gathered around. They were all fans, they wanted to know how he died. I gave them the story as accurately and compassionately as I could. They invited me and my girlfriend to participate. Girlfriend suggested I could fly up. In my Long EZ. Someone else asked if I could fly it past the crash site.

At that moment, in the dark surrounded by fanatics that I’d never met before, I knew what I had to do. When I got home I began calling EZ pilots. I wanted 5 - one spare, and four for a missing man formation.

I found 4. Long EZ pilots Catman and Pumba (who posts here as boatfly), Dave Ronneberg in the Berkut and Bram Arnold, retired F-18 pilot, in his Vari EZ. I didn’t include myself, I didn’t have enough formation flying time.

It fell apart last Thursday. Catman had a test, he couldn’t make it. I told
Dave I’d call Bram and Pumba and scrub. He looked at me over his half frames.

"Don’t be dramatic. We’ll practice over the weekend. You’ll fly #2."

So, while Badwater, O-Rings and Rick were terrorizing the crowd gathered at
Williams, I was terrifying Dave and the good people of Santa Paula, turning
lazy 8’s with my nose 8 feet from Dave’s wingtip.

Monday. We were going to pick up Bram at Hanford and Pumba at Watsonville, but Pumba showed up at our shop at Noon. Al Staats was going to ride in the back of Berkut and get photos, but his son has an iffy stomach, Al drops and Misha takes his place. Kelly Kilmartin, my partner in the Enterprise, is in my back seat.

We departed at 1:50, and overflew Hanford at 2:55. We got in a tight formation on the way to Monterey, spending about 20 minutes in a fingertip with 10 foot separation. We spread out and reformed echelon right as we got close to Monterey Airport. The wouldn’t let us land in formation but gave us a right break for 28L.

We landed at 3:50. We were met by a reporter from the local Fox affiliate, who shot a couple of talking heads to wrap around the live shot they were planing from the beach. We got a rental car map of the area and the reporter showed us the spot where the people were gathered. We checked our levels - oil, bladder and M&M’s - and adjusted as needed. We were off the ground at 5:10. Bram first, then me 15 seconds later, Dave and Pumba.

We formed up in a left echelon, turning right and climbing to 2500’. We kept
circling to the right, waiting, making a "low approach" (honest, that’s what
the tower called it) level at 2500. At 5:18 we extended the upwind leg out toward where the crowd was gathered, to verify that we understood where they - and everything else, like ships in the bay - were. I transferred underneath to Bram’s right side, then we turned back to the airport. We made two more circles, then told the Tower we were making our run.

Over the airport, throttle back to 2000 rpm, trim slightly forward and begin
the descent. Bram calls us in tighter - we’re still on tower frequency so we only respond with our flight numbers. We pass over a destroyer in the bay at about 800’, continue descending to 200’, 500’ off shore. The rocks in the water assure us there won’t be any boats beneath us.

We come up on the site at 170 kts - much slower than we could do wide open, but this gives Pumba, in his 320 Long EZ, plenty of throttle margin. Bram was watching the shoreline while we watched him, he called a countdown to Dave’s pull away.

Dave opened the throttle and pulled back. The time was 5:28 exactly. He was at 2/3 fuel, a very cruise prop and had two on board, so it wasn’t a space shuttle launch - he pulled up to about 45 degrees and went to 3000 feet in about 30 seconds. We rolled right, over the ocean, and started turning. I was thankful for a back seater to watch the water - I was flying welded wing and the turn dropped me toward the water some. A tight 270, at a 50 degree bank or so, climbing, so as we flew over the crowd in a 3 ship we were at 1000 feet and climbing away into the sun.

We regrouped for the flight home, Bram left after a few minutes and headed for Hanford. As we flew the sun moved between layers, streaking the sky with deep crimson and blue. It was the most spectacular sunset I’ve seen in years. I don’t have a John Denver tape for my airplane, we flew home to Bob Segar, The B-52’s, Roy Orbison and Larenna McKenna. I’ll have to put his greatest hits in the map box.

When I got home there was a message waiting for me. One of the organizers called from Monterey, and said that as we flew over every bird in the
area took off and followed us. A few minutes later, as they were putting out
their candles, a rainbow appeared.

It was as perfect a day flying as I’ve ever had. I flew better than I ever
have before, surrounded by pilots who cut me no slack at all. My only wish is that we had not been flying to say goodby.

But we were. Goodbye, John.
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  #20  
Old 04-20-2006, 11:06 PM
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Dennis Passey Dennis Passey is offline
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What can I say Richard.
You...have made my day with your account. Thankyou.
I will have my wife put this in calligraphy and if you have a photo of yourself and your bird I wold like to make a plaque with a photo of John and N555JD that I took off the net and your account. I live here in Monterey and saw the plane take off from a distance- I didnt see him go in..but I heard about it within minutes on a local radio station. I often drive by Lovers Point and think what a shame that that fuel valve was located over his left shoulder. Frequently I listen to his "Wildlife Concert" which was near the end and he said he was just beginning to learn how to use his voice..he did sound better and better. I get pretty emotional even now as I listen to "Eagles and Horses", a later song of his and gaze at the peaceful ocean there at the Point during a beautiful sunset and look towards Mt Toro - a direct line between the airport and his crash site. What a song- he was a simple good guy and loved flying and nature so much..that is why my avator is John Denver smiling broadly with a laugh as he pilots his biplane upward [ yep look closely- it's him]. Please accept my deepest thanks for shareing your tribute to a great flyer and a really nice guy. Even if I dont know you I am glad to know of someone whom I respect and have thier/your account of your send off. I am sure John appreciated the efforts of you all in remembrance of one of his most favorite endeavors while here on earth. God speed, brothers.
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  #21  
Old 04-22-2006, 10:46 PM
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Dennis Passey Dennis Passey is offline
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This was from a few months ago when Ted and I and non- builder Brad,[but impressed with Cozy guy] drove down to Marcs digs in So Cal desert for some flyin and lunch and more flyin. I was asked my impressions of the experience by1286 in a private Message- and this was in my IM list- so I thought I would post it here before deleteing.

[prequel- I wrote this in the dark and could not see the keyboard]
This was my second day of flights with Marc and the Cozy mark Iv is such a great airplane. Some would say it is hard to be objective when I have put thousands of $ into my build, but it really isnt. I have a friend in the UK who doesnt know much about fiberglass building other than his thinks it must be smelly and sticky- so he favors building an RV in the future...He just wont get as sleek and cool of a plane if he goes that route..but if all he wants to do is get up in the air without a lot of cool factor- he is on the rightb track with that RV.Yes it does have grass field capabilities.
That said, it brings me to the point of my experiences with Marc, 1st, he's a nice guy...easy to go out to lunch with and etc- but, 2nd, he has THE airplane of my choice to offer a ride in- and thats a great combination!
As soon as you drive up to his plane you are impressed with the shape- you notice he has some paint issues[which he is 1st to admit, he will be painting his plane in the future- and dreading the effort, he says] But the Mark IV shape is just so unique and you know its not just a two seater and etc etc - It's a REAL airplane!.. not just a cessna 172 "car" with wings- It doesnt look like a car, it looks quasi-jetlike with no funky prop in the front and it goes and goes FAST with impressive stats.... and you know that this is the EXACT same plane you are building and you are about to fly in it, and you just want to absorb every bit of sensory input because someday, someday, this is THE plane that YOU will call yours and YOu will get to be on Marcs end offering the hopefuls that are on the long road, a taste of what they are spending nights in their garages hunched over parts and systems building their creations..oh yea- Its a good place to be mentally, phyically and emotionally.
So, that said, Marc does his preflight asks us all our wieghts and we climb in. he goes thru his checklist and we taxi out and do the run up. Beautiful day- This 1st flight we are at gross with all big boys except Marc and we use all the runway at the present density altitude.. We climb out and the view from the backseat is not generous but works and I can see pretty well over the strakes to the earth below. I love looking at the winglets cuz my freinds gulfstream 5 has winglets [ yea, he is the cheif pilot on that private bird and even HE wants to just outright buy a Cozy mark IV down the road a bit]!..Later when I get to fly a while in Marcs right seat- it is the best- awesome VISIBIlity. The canard is a great visual reference and I dont think blocks the view in a negative way. The side stick controls dont require much effort at all to effect flight changes- think it, move your hand a tad and youve made a made a movement in the sky. You dont use your rudders except on take off and landings- the ball stays coordinated pretty closly just using the aileorons-characteristic of the design. The plane hauls a$$ fast even with the big guys on board and this is the 180 hp catto performance prop rig- Marcs Shadin fuel management said we were sippimg 7.8 gph at 165mph at 5500ft at about 55 degrees airbtemp. NOT a cessna 172 like Ive been trining in. Love the reclining seat position. Checking for air traffic outside the windows is very easy compared to the 172 - no raging blind spots from a pillars or b pillars.... Just an awesome plane and a really NICE guy to make a view of my future take shape for an afternoon. And collectivly we all chipped in for a generous "tip" cuz I am sure there are a few who have forgotten to say thanks to him in that way. He didnt expect it- but we all should do it.
I Had no regrets in starting my build without even seeing one of these in person.... and last OSH KOSh when Marc let me ride with him it intensified the knowledge exponentially that I had not wasted my time and my money.. thats my .02 !
Thanks again Marc- for a great day.
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  #22  
Old 10-05-2006, 10:13 AM
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jimbus jimbus is offline
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Default Flight Report from Cozy 540RG

I wasn't quite sure where to put this, but here seemed a logical place. It's my flight report from Rough River this year. I was very fortunate to get a ride in Chris Esselstyn's hot rod Cozy 540RG. In thanking Chris for the ride, he suggested that I share my experiences so that some of you that didn't get a ride at RR or have never had a canard ride might get an idea of what makes these planes so special.

I fly out of KDEC, which is almost exactly 200 nautical miles from RR. I headed down Saturday morning with my buddy in his club's C172S. With a nice little tail wind, we were making around 145 knots ground speed, which is pretty darn fast for a 172. With onboard nexrad radar, we could see the weather getting a little ugly around 2I3, so we parked at a little strip at Tell City, IN for about an hour while a rain storm went through. Back on our trusty spam can, we landed at RR about 11 am. (A side note, my buddy decided on final that he was going to land long intentionally. There was a crowd right next to the runway and he didn't want to get a failing landing grade!).

Shortly after landing, Chris found me and asked if I was ready to go. He said he had a ride to give somebody else and then it was my turn. I watched Chris load up and taxi out. What impressed me at this point was that on start up and roll out, his plane sounds just like a P-51 Mustang. Chris took off and left the pattern, only to return about 10 minutes later to do a screaming low level, full throttle pass down the runway.(I asked his passenger how fast they were going, he said 248 KIAS!) After clearing the runway, he pulled up to what I would guess would be 50 or 60 degrees, followed by a knife edge turn to the left and leveling off. Very impressive! A few minutes later and he landed. Now it was my turn.

Chris loaded my up and he strapped in. Since I'm somewhat of a freak, it was a tight fit (I'm 6'5" and 210 lbs), but nothing that can't be solved with a few mods. Start up and taxi out, canopy down and locked and we're ready to go. On take off, the feeling is very "jet like". Acceleration is smooth, not neck snapping. Rotation is also smooth, I would guess we took 1500' or so for take off. Once up, the gear comes up with no noticable pitch change, or if there is any, Chris masked it with his considerable pilot skills. We turned left and headed out of the pattern.

The first thing I noticed is that the view out the canopy is SPECTACLAR. With the main wing behind you, nothing above, your view is virtually unlimited. The canard is there, but it doesn't seem to mask anything. When Chris leveled off, he gave me a brief tour of the GRT screens, which are very impressive. We were loafing along at 175 KIAS, and about 2250 rpm if I remember. The ride was rock solid and very smooth. Chris said we needed some more altitude and then he's let me take her. He added throttle and pulled back on the stick. Up we go at 3000 fpm! The deck angle wasn't excessive and forward visability was OK. When he leveled off, he gave me the plane and said do what you want. I looked down and we were doing 200KIAS!

We went left, we went right, we went up and we went down. What a riot! I'd never had so much fun flying an airplane. The whole time, the plane is rock solid in feel. The controls are very linear in feel as well. It is very stable, it didn't want to wander at all. And it was very easy to fly. In fact, I would say it was easier to fly than the C172 we came down in. Very impressive. I didn't feel any turbulance or bobbles during the flight at all. Smooth as can be.

Unfortunatley for me, the weather turned bad on us, and I didn't get to experience the low pass and pull up. We had to head back. Chris took us back, following the GRT's leading, which was very intuitive. Along the way, we hit some pretty good rain showers. I didn't notice any pitch changes, although Chris said he sometimes gets a pitch UP change in rain. We rolled out on final, Chris put the gear down at about 130 knots. A slight, and I mean very slight, bobble when the mains came out, but only for a second. On final, gear down, brake down, the airplane was totally stable. I'm sure some of that was Chris' excellant pilot skills, but it was impressive either way. We touched down at 80 knots and braked to a stop with at least 1000' left. I did notice some front wheel shimmy, but it wasn't bad and Chris didn't comment.

I can only summerize this experience by quoting Will Smith from the movie "Indepenance Day". "I have got to get me one of these!". This plane was everything I had anticipated and much more. It looks totally cool, sounds great, flies great, is great fun, and it goes like stink! What more could anyone possibly want???

To end my report, we had to wait over 2 hours to get out of RR due to lingering thunderstorms. We finally blasted out (not) in our trusty C172 and headed back home at a blistering 108 knots ground speed. Dennis Oleman passed us his way back to Iowa. I thought we were going backwards when he went by.

Many thanks to Chris for not only giving me a ride, but several others as well. And for spending lots of time answering questions from just about all of us there. He typifies what I've found in most canard builder/drivers, very unselfish and giving of his time and his beautiful machine. To those of you that haven't had the opportunity to get a canard ride, do so at the earliest convenience. Beg, plead, bribe, do what ever you have to. I can just about guarentee if will be the ride of your life.
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  #23  
Old 10-05-2006, 12:06 PM
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Steve parkins Steve parkins is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimbus View Post
I wasn't quite sure where to put this, but here seemed a logical place. It's my flight report from Rough River this year. I was very fortunate to get a ride in Chris Esselstyn's hot rod Cozy 540RG. In thanking Chris for the ride, he suggested that I share my experiences so that some of you that didn't get a ride at RR or have never had a canard ride might get an idea of what makes these planes so special.

I fly out of KDEC, which is almost exactly 200 nautical miles from RR. I headed down Saturday morning with my buddy in his club's C172S. With a nice little tail wind, we were making around 145 knots ground speed, which is pretty darn fast for a 172. With onboard nexrad radar, we could see the weather getting a little ugly around 2I3, so we parked at a little strip at Tell City, IN for about an hour while a rain storm went through. Back on our trusty spam can, we landed at RR about 11 am. (A side note, my buddy decided on final that he was going to land long intentionally. There was a crowd right next to the runway and he didn't want to get a failing landing grade!).

Shortly after landing, Chris found me and asked if I was ready to go. He said he had a ride to give somebody else and then it was my turn. I watched Chris load up and taxi out. What impressed me at this point was that on start up and roll out, his plane sounds just like a P-51 Mustang. Chris took off and left the pattern, only to return about 10 minutes later to do a screaming low level, full throttle pass down the runway.(I asked his passenger how fast they were going, he said 248 KIAS!) After clearing the runway, he pulled up to what I would guess would be 50 or 60 degrees, followed by a knife edge turn to the left and leveling off. Very impressive! A few minutes later and he landed. Now it was my turn.

Chris loaded my up and he strapped in. Since I'm somewhat of a freak, it was a tight fit (I'm 6'5" and 210 lbs), but nothing that can't be solved with a few mods. Start up and taxi out, canopy down and locked and we're ready to go. On take off, the feeling is very "jet like". Acceleration is smooth, not neck snapping. Rotation is also smooth, I would guess we took 1500' or so for take off. Once up, the gear comes up with no noticable pitch change, or if there is any, Chris masked it with his considerable pilot skills. We turned left and headed out of the pattern.

The first thing I noticed is that the view out the canopy is SPECTACLAR. With the main wing behind you, nothing above, your view is virtually unlimited. The canard is there, but it doesn't seem to mask anything. When Chris leveled off, he gave me a brief tour of the GRT screens, which are very impressive. We were loafing along at 175 KIAS, and about 2250 rpm if I remember. The ride was rock solid and very smooth. Chris said we needed some more altitude and then he's let me take her. He added throttle and pulled back on the stick. Up we go at 3000 fpm! The deck angle wasn't excessive and forward visability was OK. When he leveled off, he gave me the plane and said do what you want. I looked down and we were doing 200KIAS!

We went left, we went right, we went up and we went down. What a riot! I'd never had so much fun flying an airplane. The whole time, the plane is rock solid in feel. The controls are very linear in feel as well. It is very stable, it didn't want to wander at all. And it was very easy to fly. In fact, I would say it was easier to fly than the C172 we came down in. Very impressive. I didn't feel any turbulance or bobbles during the flight at all. Smooth as can be.

Unfortunatley for me, the weather turned bad on us, and I didn't get to experience the low pass and pull up. We had to head back. Chris took us back, following the GRT's leading, which was very intuitive. Along the way, we hit some pretty good rain showers. I didn't notice any pitch changes, although Chris said he sometimes gets a pitch UP change in rain. We rolled out on final, Chris put the gear down at about 130 knots. A slight, and I mean very slight, bobble when the mains came out, but only for a second. On final, gear down, brake down, the airplane was totally stable. I'm sure some of that was Chris' excellant pilot skills, but it was impressive either way. We touched down at 80 knots and braked to a stop with at least 1000' left. I did notice some front wheel shimmy, but it wasn't bad and Chris didn't comment.

I can only summerize this experience by quoting Will Smith from the movie "Indepenance Day". "I have got to get me one of these!". This plane was everything I had anticipated and much more. It looks totally cool, sounds great, flies great, is great fun, and it goes like stink! What more could anyone possibly want???

To end my report, we had to wait over 2 hours to get out of RR due to lingering thunderstorms. We finally blasted out (not) in our trusty C172 and headed back home at a blistering 108 knots ground speed. Dennis Oleman passed us his way back to Iowa. I thought we were going backwards when he went by.

Many thanks to Chris for not only giving me a ride, but several others as well. And for spending lots of time answering questions from just about all of us there. He typifies what I've found in most canard builder/drivers, very unselfish and giving of his time and his beautiful machine. To those of you that haven't had the opportunity to get a canard ride, do so at the earliest convenience. Beg, plead, bribe, do what ever you have to. I can just about guarentee if will be the ride of your life.
ty for that right up, you said it just the way i would have(exept for the speling)
it was me in the flt just befor you, and the turn out was 3 G we think, but it had sooooooo much more, and chris is a G'8 guy.....ty Chris
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  #24  
Old 08-22-2007, 01:28 PM
dbradford04 dbradford04 is offline
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Default Re: Flying Stories NEEDED

Our day in the FUN!

So I have been dreaming about these planes since Dick's flight around the world years ago. I also grew up a HUGE John Denver fan, and oddly when he passed, I watched a CNN news event about it where a reporter took a ride on someone's EZ. The reporter was trying to maintain a somber attitude, but couldn't wipe the grin off his face as he exited the plnae...I was hooked.

Fast forward many years, and I find myself in Southern California in touch with David Orr. David offers to give me and the wife rides on a sunny warm day at Santa Monica.

WOW! I can't even describe the feeling of that flight. I'm 6'4 and barely fit in the back seat, but it still one of the most amazing half hours of my life. The biggets thing I remember was seeing a police Heli below us. David swooped down over the top of him just as the Heli took a right turn up a canyon. We swooped up and around to the right over him again...it was amazing.

The wife got to go over to Catalina and skim waves...she is a speed demon and loved every minute of it. Needless to say she hopes that one day we can get our own. The Long is too small for me, so I am going to have to find a Berkut or a stretch of some kind, but I am hooked. Time and money are the onlyu obstacles at this point. As soon as the youngest one is out of college....

I have a picture of David and I sitting in the plane as a background on my computer and cell phone.

D
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  #25  
Old 08-22-2007, 02:22 PM
satch satch is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: SWFL
Posts: 76
Default Re: Flying Stories NEEDED

Welcome to the dark side!
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  #26  
Old 08-22-2007, 04:47 PM
neverquit's Avatar
neverquit neverquit is offline
G.Norman
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Lathrup Village, MI
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Default Re: Flying Stories NEEDED

Quote:
As soon as the youngest one is out of college....
Heheh. So that means you're starting to build this week?

Anyway, if you read some of the archives, you'll know you're not the only tall guy here. Some guys are moving the front seat back an inch or two. Nothing wrong with stretching the fuse a couple inches either. But begin now with the plans, a gallon of epoxy, some foam, and make those bookends. You can put your photo of you and Dave in it.
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  #27  
Old 08-23-2007, 05:34 PM
dbradford04 dbradford04 is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Murrieta, CA
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Default Re: Flying Stories NEEDED

By the way I am in Florida now. If there is anyone else near Jacksonville that wants to fly, I'll buy the fuel!

D
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