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  #1  
Old 08-17-2005, 05:51 AM
David Staten's Avatar
David Staten David Staten is offline
Rotary Powered Velocity
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: KEFD, Houston Area, Texas
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Default Progress on Chris's Rotary Velocity

Ok... after a long hiatus regarding posts on N17010, Chris Barber's rotary powered velocity, I have some progress to report.

Even though the aircraft is rotary powered, there are other issues besides the engine so I placed it in the general powerplant forum. Dust: relocate it where it fits best.

Chris has pretty much deferred to me regarding powerplant issues and I have made that one of my major focuses with regards to the plane. I am not saying he is "hands off carte blanc" but we talk about things, explain why I do or do not want to do something, and we move forward. I had several major portions just "come together" within the past week or two, but I wanted to make sure he was back from vacation and aware of recent events before I published them for the world to see.

Issue 1:
We have been challenged in the intake department. Our plan from as early as last year was to use the Turretine intake. We deferred work of our own based on the expectation that it would be available and useable. Unfortunately, this ended up being an unuseable product for us in the end. Bruce's intake is mounted perpendicular to the block and sticks straight out laterally, into the space to be occupied by our turbocharger. I confirmed with Bruce late in the game that this intake was not going to be compatible with our turbo setup due to this geometry. Back to square one.

I pinged the list for ideas and parts. I ended up buying a stock lower intake manifold from Bob White back in May. I then took this and cut it off to use part of it as a mounting flange for a fabbed intake. I also searched Ebay for alumimum tubing to serve as runners, and I cut up an upper intake manifold I had laying around for its mounting flange and plenum before the Throttle Body. Throughout this endeavor I have wanted to use the stock Throttle Body, or design an alternative that separates the primary and secondary runners. My rationale for this is to improve engine performance, particularly at low manifold pressure, when fuel is ONLY being injected in the primaries. I have noted on several occasions that others have had problems with low rpm idling, something I wish to avoid to save brake wear on the ground.

So.. took my ebay aluminum runners and my cut up manifold pieces and then got distracted. Life took over for a bit.. I became the Vice Pres of the EAA chapter here, restarted the news letter, hosted a few young eagles events and in general didn't do much except shop ebay with regards to the plane. Chris and I have ALWAYS wanted to be able to weld.. and neither of us had a welder.. so thanks to Ebay and my thriftiness, managed to get a shop welder for less than $200 (new price $400). After buying the argon cylinder for doing MIG and trying out my new toy, I decided to give welding aluminum a try.

Keep in mind: I was well aware that welding aluminum is VERY technically difficult. Everyone I have ever talked to said it was a tough skill, and the reasons for that being so. Still, I wanted to prove to myself that I could (or could not) do it. The intake, while an important component, is not as critical as one thinks: It is not a structural, loadbearing item. It only needs to be free flowing and sealed, able to withstand the air pressures imposed on it by the inductions system.

Well, I never got to find out how much I sucked at welding aluminum. Suffice it to say, the wire feed was the main culprit. Aluminum wire is very soft, and when being force fed down a 12 foot conduit, things just dont go well. I could get it fed when not under load, but as soon as I struck an arc, it jammed and coiled up inside the feed mechanism. No amount of tinkering could change the end result. After a few hours of troubleshooting and tinkering, I resigned myself to the fact that I was NOT able to weld aluminum with the equipment I had.

My next curveball came in late July when I took the T6061 aluminum tubing that I had to a muffler/brake shop that I had been a patron of for over 15 years.. to get the tubing bent. Their muffler guy gave it a shot, and at about 15 degrees of bend, the tubing just snapped. Can you say "work hardening"? Ok.. at THIS point I am really frustrated, and on the way home stop by home depot and walmart and buy some PVC conduit, fill foam, innertubes and ponder a composite/fiberglass intake system. I also took a piece of scrap exhaust pipe from the muffler shop for pondering purposes.

Fast forward to three weeks ago. I went back to said muffler/brake shop and spoke with the muffler guy and asked him if he wanted to try something special. We talked about him building my intake for me, out of steel. After some preliminary discussion, he gave me some homework: I make the flanges and he would make the runners. He agreed to charge me for parts only, as he would be doing this during spare time and this wasn't an official shop job.

I proceded to get some 1/16 (i believe, dont quote me right now) steel strap and I went to work on my end. I dulled 2 dremel bits and several grinding wheels but eventually had my two flanges with fairly matched ports. We agreed to insert the runners INSIDE the ports and weld from both ends, to improve strength, as well as guarantee a seal. Note to others: wear long sleeves and gloves when doing this kind of steel work - metal splinters are a pain, and take a while to wear out of the skin.

2 weeks ago I dropped off the flanges, as well as "engine two's" rotor housings and irons. I used 3 bolts to place them together in alignment so he could see what he had to deal with, from a space and geometry standpoint. In two days he had some preliminary parts done, which I took to the hangar and showed Chris, and returned to the shop. 1 week ago he called and said "Its Done".

The parts cost $160 or so, and I paid John, the shop guy another $100 in cash as a tip for his labor. I also let him know more work (and $$) was forthcoming. The intake flanges and runners weigh 10.5 pounds, and is SOLID. I do not plan to hang the throttle unsupported, but it appears I COULD safely. I will be needing to return it to him when I get injector bosses for him to fit/weld on there and I am sure I will need other metal work done before we fly. Time will tell. Initial paint job was black to prevent corrosion, but I will repaint after we have the injector bosses, so that it matches the underlying engine paint scheme.

On fitting the intake on "engine one" in the plane, I could tell there was a little bit of warpage, not unexpected, that required me to open up a mounting hole or two, but once done, everything bolts up like it should.

Attached pictures:
Picture one shows conceptually where the throttle needs to be located, for clearance issues with both the cowling and spark plugs. I didn't want to have to remove the intake/TB to change plugs during PM, so this was important for me.

Picture two shows the intake flange for the engine side of the intake. Also visible is a portion of the fuel rail I intend to use. The water and EGR passages are sealed with this flange. I used 4" plate. 6" would have been better, as the forward/front end housing is slightly "taller" on the bolt pattern than compared to the rear/aft end housing. If you look, you see the bolt holes are "notches". Washers will be used,but even without, the fit is good and solid.

Note in both pics there are chains on the engine: We had a squatting incident not too long ago when I put the engine back on the plane for intake design, we did not ballast the nose. At this state of the build, there is no battery up front. We had stuff on the canard weighing it down but the balance was precarious. Chris knocked a paperclip off or swatted a fly and the whole damn thing sat back on its tail. All of the tools, parts and buckets sitting on the wings and canards went to the floor. (insert "oh shit! moment" here). After chris changed his underwear, he called me to let me know what happened, and from that point on I placed the engine hoist on the block to support the weight (it bleeds down and slowly sits back over a few days) but more importantly, within the week we ballasted the nose until things are further along up forward. With the ballast, the hoist was back out of the picture again, but we are lucky: nothing broke when we squatted, and lesson learned.

Picture three is an overall view of the intake on a preliminary install.

Picture four shows the engine side of the intake.

Picture five shows the throttle side of the intake. There is going to be interference between the oil bypass block inlet and hose with the TB. I will put an angle fitting on the Oil Bypass block, and I will likely mount the throttle cabling attach points to the bypass block.

Thats all for this post: More issues covered in subsequent posts.
Dave Staten
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  #2  
Old 08-17-2005, 07:14 AM
John Slade's Avatar
John Slade John Slade is offline
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Looks good, Dave. You ended up with something similar to mine. The only difference is that my runners connect to a 4 inch diameter plenum and the TB is on the forward end facing forward. 10lbs isnt bad. Mines aluminum and it's not much less than that. Congratulations on a big forward step.

If someone would just go into production with a suitable bolt-on wrap over manifold life in the rotary world would be so much easier. Steve - are you listening?
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  #3  
Old 08-17-2005, 07:37 AM
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David Staten David Staten is offline
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Default Progress Part 2

The second issue I have been facing has been the mounting of the throttle planning the "plumbing" for the intake system. The original plan was to use a portion of the upper plenum from a stock intake system. This provided for a good mounting flange, pre-plumbed for pressure sensor tubing. Drawbacks were bulk and weight. Placement was going to be tricky, due to size and constraints of the cowling and access to the spark plugs.

When I abandoned my plan to "roll my own" using stock parts with aluminum runners, I elected to still use the stock flange and spacer. I cut the flange away from the plenum and upper manifold then proceded to use a belt sander with coarse grit to slowly grind away the backside of the flange until smooth. I ended up with about 1/2" thick flange that was already plumbed. I removed the studs and reamed the holes slightly. I then took a black throttle spacer and traced the passageways. This spacer takes the sensor ports on the flange and routes them to corresponding ports on the Throttle Body. There are two ports that sense from the primary port on the engine side of the butterfly, as well as one that senses JUST in front of the butterfly when closed.

On the opposite side (not flange face, but SIDE) there are ports that are channeled through the TB to connect with the upper deck. The use of the flange and spacer will prevent me from having to tap and plumb the intake separately. Since there are two ports that sense the primary rail, I can send one to each controller on the RWS Engine Controller device.

Rather than use stock 8 mm bolts at the intake flange / throttle body interface, I elected to use AN5 hardware with safety wire/cotter pins. A preliminary fit up reveals no major problems, other than the throttle body and the oil bypass block inlet AN fitting.

Once the intake is fitted with injectors and painted, I will put a support shelf underneath the TB and mount it all up "for good". There is a recess on the bottom of the TB that appears to be able to be threaded, and I can use this for a single "hold down" bolt. This, coupled with the 4 bolts on the intake flange, should keep everything secure.

Picture One is annotated to describe the ports in question.

Picture two shows the backside of the ground down aluminum flange. Some of the casting of the interior of the plenum is still visible. This may be ground down further, depending on how well sealing is. The opposite sides of the spacer and throttle body are shown.

Picture three is a "before" pic of what I originally was going to try: cast plenum and upper intake flange.

Picture 4 is a composite of the Throttle Body, Spacer and ground down flange. This will mate with the new intake's steel flange with AN5 bolts. If you have seen a stock TB before, you are probably noticing that a LOT of crap has been removed from the TB, namely the "choke" butterflies and linkage, ALL actuators and throttle position sensors. If it didnt affect the primary purposes in my install, it came off.

Some folks have mentioned in the past to reverse the throttle springs so that if the throttle cable opens, the throttle fails open, rather than closed. On this particular TB I do not see a practical way to do this without major modification. Many of the springs and respective mounting points are not reversible. There IS a second linkage attachment point that the cruise control uses. This could be used for a second cable, and they are "competitive" in function. Which ever cable/linkage is pulled "more open" wins, so both would have to be released in order to close the throttle. Anyways.. thats it on part two

Dave Staten
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  #4  
Old 08-17-2005, 08:53 AM
David Staten's Avatar
David Staten David Staten is offline
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Default Part 3, Build Your Own Audio Panel

This is installment three in the latest updates on Chris's Velocity as built upon by Dave.

Avionics are the last thing one typically buys for a homebuilt in today's present R & D market. As soon as you get the device and open the box it's bordering on obsolescence. At least Tracy Crook has been gracious with the upgrades are reasonable cost.

Anyways, as you noticed in post 1, I had been following Ebay for some good used secondhand avionics for initial outfitting. We can put in the $14,000 worth of Grand Rapids with another $10,000 in Garmin-ology later on. To get airborne all I need is a handheld or simple nav/com and either a small PFD or a 6 pack of sorts (no vacuum instruments, since the plane is all electric)

In this vein, I have been keeping watch on what is out there with regards to Narco, King, Appolo/Garmin and their clones on the used market. I also had always planned on building my own audio panel and marker beacon reciever in a kit form. Jim Weir, a regular on the kitplane magazine electronic's column, owns and operates a company in Deer Valley California called RST Engineering.

Without giving his life story, essentially he sells kits for making your own antennas, audio panels, intercoms and marker beacon recievers. He USED to sell 720 channel nav com kits, but with the latest channel spacing requirements, his analog products were no longer practical to build or legal to transmit in that regulatory environment.

So, while I was waiting on the welder (from the first post) I had also ordered RST's audio panel and remote mount marker beacon reciever. One caveat now: The jury is still out on "service". On his website it clearly states he is a mail order business and that his shipping times may approach 2 weeks from shipping date. Well, 2 weeks came and went, and I sent email inquiring about what was going on, and what to expect. After a few days I got mail back that someone working in the shop who did assembly of the kits had quit without notice. He expected another week or two delay in recovering from this event from a shipping standpoint.

Osh was approaching, and having followed Jim for years on Usenet (rec.aviation.*) I knew he was a regular attendee and would be heading east shortly. Well, the kit arrived shortly before OSH, and I tore into building the marker beacon reciever first.

Both devices arrived in a single "book" sized box and consisted of the outer cases, the Printed Circuit Boards (PCB's) and bags containing all the resistors, capacitors, diodes, Integrated circuits, switches, LED's and wires. Some solder was added for good measure.

The marker beacon kit went together quite well for an "amatuer". There were a few hitches, however, and while I like Jim and what he does for aviation, I am going to be less than glowing about his product.

The instruction manual actually gives some pretty good detail and preparation for component identification. The only downside on the marker beacon kit is that the last revision of the parts list and construction manuals occurred in 1996. A few components (maybe 5 diodes and transistors total) had "improved" over time and had new part numbers. This revision had not made it into the manual. Given the level of detail required to assemble the device, and the need to inventory every SINGLE part, some under magnifying glass, I think that keeping the parts list up to date is a must-do function.

I completed the marker beacon reciever maybe 2 weeks ago.. during or just after OSH (I didnt go to OSH), and used my skills to work on the audio panel.
The audio panel and intercom, in Jim's words, is one most densely packed board they have fielded, and many holes are close to each other. My translation: tedious. Imagine maybe 300 components on a 6 x 5 board. I went through the inventory and discovered 4 resistors were missing, and I am not sure if I misplaced the 5th or was it missing as well. The kit components came in sealed plastic bags, in a manner that leads me to believe they were pre-filled at an earlier time, so that when kits are packed for shipping its a matter of "grabbing bags" to fill an order.

If this is the case, then who knows if other orders are/were affected. Well, I didn't let this slow me down, and over a few days I soldered the approx 200-300 components to the breadboard/PCB. I sent off mail to Jim (or at least the Tech support mailbox, not sure if it goes to him first or not) and it took 3 emails listing progressive part problems before I got a response. This was 10 days ago or so. The content of the letter led me to believe that the parts would be in the mail by last monday (8 days ago). No parts yet. Time to follow up.

At this point the Audio panel is 95% complete. 5 resistors need to be installed when they arrive. An upgraded LED option that was ordered was not found, and I am 95% sure it was not in the box when it arrived, but I am looking around the house/shop anyways for its distinctive pink packet Jim says he packs it in. The upgrade is for white and blue LED's: the audio panel xmit recieve lights also do double duty as Marker Beacon lamps. In the past few years, blue and while LED's have become more affordable to the point he could include them as an option in the kit, rather than having a green or red marker beacon lamp. The only things left to install are those LED's and resistors, then completing the last bit of wiring, from the switch panel PCB to the main PCB. I didn't want to "connect" the two boards together until all the components were installed.

As you can tell, all of this is ongoing work in progress. I want BADLY to leave a favorable reference for Jim and his product, but right now its difficult to do so in view of the results and communications thus far. I would presume he would reply timely to emails, and I know he is online frequently as he posts regulary (every other day or so) on usenet.

The orignal incarnation of this post was 11,000+ words, the limit is 10,000, so see the next post for the continued story..

Dave
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Old 08-17-2005, 08:56 AM
David Staten's Avatar
David Staten David Staten is offline
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Default Part 3- A - Continued

The marker beacon calibration was accomplished last night/yesterday morning.
First the device is "pre-aged" to help prevent components from drifting from their tuned settings. This is done using a night in the freezer and a night in a 120-140 degree hotbox and night at room temp. Afterwards, practical calibration begins. There are several options: 1) send it back to california and they do it on the bench for $20-30 bucks plus shipping. 2) Do it with your own bench instruments ($$$ if you dont have them, or a buddy in an avionics shop - the non buddy shop rate approaches $80/hr and you have to make a harness or pay them to make one) 3) Do it without instruments. After pondering options 1 and 2, I elected to do option 3 and set out mapping marker beacons.

Essentially, you get close to a marker beacon, hook up an earphone and twist amplifying transformers until the LED marker beacon peaks in intensity, then gate the brightness halfway down with a variable resistor, then peak it again and continue until you have peaked the transformers. The next step requires equipment or a plane, and I have neither, so it is deferred, but this second step involves setting the low end sensitivity. If you dont have a 1000 Microvolt marker beacon generator, then you can fly over at DOUBLE the AGL altitude you normally would, and set the low sensitivity value. This will be done AFTER initial flight test or late in phase 1. It will require a second crewmember to do safely.

The initial cal involved me rigging up a straight wire antenna, and checking Airnav for marker beacon sites near Hobby (KHOU) and Ellington (KEFD). My best bet was Hobby, from a proximity and accessibility standpoint, and once I had my test rig put together (speaker, antenna, power cable, and temporary mounting of the LED's) I struck out for Hobby airport 15 miles up the road. I checked with tower to ensure the navaids were on/functioning. Most accessible was the MM for ILS 12R. According to my calculation (and GPS) it sits 2 blocks back in a neighborhood. Unfortunately, I heard nothing. Couldn't find it at night (empty field/park where the GPS said it should be). No blinky blinky either. Stumped, I drove around to other spots, still nothing. I had blinking when I powered up, and I could tell the speaker would power up and down, but no marker beacon. I checked with FSS and discovered that the ILS 12R was notamed out of service until 7a (this was overnight, I was off work and work nights).

So, head 11 miles east to Laporte Airport (T41). The Outer marker for Ellingtons ILS 22 is located near La Porte, and I had always heard it when on downwind in the pattern at La Porte. While driving down the road I discovered by temp antenna was inserted wrong, and was grounding out on the casing, which meant "no antenna". Well, using my GPS, a Key Map (VERY detailed street map of the Houston Area - couple hundred page book) and my knowledge of the area, I searched out the marker beacon.

La Porte is a "small town" that used to be a place in its own right. Houston's other burbs grew out to meet it, and developers have purchased up big chunks of what used to be pasture and planted houses there. The best description is "suburbanized country" for this part of LaPorte. My first attempt took me into a subdivision just west of the airport. By the GPS, I got within 500 feet of where it "should" be, but had to back out, and drive 6 miles around the airport and back roads to get to the dead-end road along a ditch right of way to get to the marker site itself. I pulled up within 30 feet of the marker beacon's antenna just outside the fence and the box began to make noise and blink. (I had fixed MY antenna to be workable at this point)

It turns out the initial settings called out in the book were so de-tuned that I had to be that close, but as I adjusted things, it got quite noisy in the truck. Finally got everything where it needed to be, and then headed for breakfast.

Next step, talk to Chris about a marker beacon antenna and working on an instrument and avionics rack in the cockpit. We haven't paid much attention to this part yet, and the instrument panel is simply not sturdy enough to mount all these devices to.

Picture one is the marker beacon receiver. The big black wire tie is NOT part of the assembly and only there to hold things still while testing. The top case half is bolted to the bottom case half so I can reach all the tuning points during calibration. Normally its all closed up.

Picture two is a picture of the audio panel components all installed (minus the missing resistors). The switch panel wires are tucked under the main circuit board for now, and will be soldered into the front of the board for final assembly.

Picture 3 has a shot of the switch panel as well. The volume and squelch knobs arent installed here. It's not too foreign a design, and reminds me of a King KMA 20-24 type device.

Picture 4 is the bottom of both audio panel PCB's just so you can see ALL of the connections I had to install, solder and trim. You get quite good at it after a while.

So, is it for you? Perhaps. Average pilot? no. Average homebuilder? Probably. The key is attention to detail, and positively identifying every part before installing it (resistor color codes can be tricky). The other key is having the right equipment - fine tip pencil iron.. otherwise you will burn the traces off the board or you will bridge a gap that shouldnt be bridged.

Anyways, thats the latest and final (FOR NOW) installment on Chris's velocity.

Upcoming needs/plans:
EM2 will need to be paid for soon.
Electric water pump
direct drive alternator, along with belt drive alternator backup
propellor
Instruments and radios
Wiring the electrical system
Radiator

I still think December is a reasonable first flight goal. We will see.
Dave Staten
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Last edited by David Staten : 08-17-2005 at 11:06 AM.
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Old 08-17-2005, 10:17 AM
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First of all - lookin good

second of all - RST - shipped the antenna wire and baluns just fine. the two headsets we bought years ago - not good - a waste of time(allot to assemble) and money. they simply buzzzzzz using most piper and cessna audio panels. jim knows of the problem and promised to send us, many times, the fix to install. A resister or something. nothing ever came
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Old 08-17-2005, 10:37 AM
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Note on the aluminum tube. to bend it you probably needed to anneal it. from what i have seen that is heating it up with an oxy acetylene torch with a sooty flame. it would then probably bend.

thats what the TV motorcycle guys do before bangin out a part for a cycle. the process would probably take a little practice

so many materials to learn and understand - give me back foam/ fiberglass or wood
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Enjoy the build,njut av byggandet, godere il costruire, nyd bygningen, geniesse den Bau, apolafse tin kataskevi, disfrute la construcción, curta a construção, Pidä hauskaa rakentamisen parissa, bouw lekker,uživaj grade?inaslajdaites postroikoi, geniet die bou
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Old 08-17-2005, 11:10 AM
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Damn, I just finished a nice little commentary and my internet service "farted" and the reply was lost. Gee, the techno stuff is such a love/hate relationship.

Dave, sweeeeeeet. Well done.

I was out sanding and adding micro last night from about 2:00 am till about 8:00 am. My cell phone is not accepting a charge (off to Cingular tonight to see what gives) so I was unable to call or be called.

10lbs is not that bad. I am glad John chimed in stating his AL intake is not that much less. Maybe my 20lbs weight loss (with another 30lbs to go , I hope) will help the effort. Being a fat middle age lawyer is much different than being a fat middle age cop .

BTW, the instruments will be supported by aluminum brackets behind the "flimsy" fiberglass panel and should provide a solid install. It seems pretty straight forward.

I am having some issues nailing down the upholstery guy (he says he is backed up due to his main "needle and thread guy" being in jail for back child support ), but I shall probably try to reach him again tomorrow.

Off to sleep, I just started graveyard shift at the PD this week. YAWN.

All the best,

Chris
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Old 08-17-2005, 03:33 PM
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Steve parkins Steve parkins is offline
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going back to the MIG,they tell you to use a plastic liner so the AL slides better the big thing with that is it no longer eats the heat out of the tip,so the AL get to hot where it goes though the tip and will cause you to bird nest.
so if i need to use the MIG (and i dont) i just make sure it has a new liner in it, made out of steel.
when setting up the roller start with no pressure(no AL will move when trigger is pulled) and slowly add just a little no more.
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Old 08-19-2005, 08:45 AM
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David Staten David Staten is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Staten
No parts yet. Time to follow up.

Dave
In all fairness to Jim and his company, the missing parts arrived today, 14 days after he responded to my 3rd email.

Everything appears to be in order at this point. More to follow when I complete the audio panel, which will likely be today or tomorrow.

Dave
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Old 01-21-2006, 03:04 AM
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David Staten David Staten is offline
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Thought I'd add some updates to the story of Velocity N17010. Progress has been hindered not so much by time and ability as much as money and desire to hammer through the tedious. Chris is able to continue with labor on the airframe: glassing, micro, filling and in general doing what is called "contouring" or making the whole plane nice, curvy and smooth.

Myself on the other hand, have reached the point in the past few months where its not so much a matter of doing a specific task to further progress as much as it is having the funds to afford to purchase specific items to finish particular projects. Example: purchasing the EM2 Engine Monitor from Tracy Crook that will make tuning much much easier, or purchasing the radios for the stack, or the accessories to make it all work.

As of now, the stack consists of:
A KX-175B navcom
A KN-75 GS receiver
A KY-195B Com-com
an AT50A Transponder
A KLN-89B IFR approach capable GPS
An IN-381A Vor/Loc/Gs rectilinear indicator
An IN-380A Vor/Loc rectilinear indicator
A switching unit for toggling the IN-380A from GPS to a 2nd nav(when installed)

I have been fortunate enough to obtain the above with less than $2000 USD outlay so far. A single NEW, state of the art COM, like the SL40 or KX-165A would have exceeded this by a large margin. I went for reliability first (never mind the Narco when I say that... its simply to be replaced when it fails), then went with familiarity. I have a long history with the King GPS's including experience using them in actual IFR (legally..I might add), and so the learning curve is not so steep.

Originally I had planned on a double wide stack that wasnt very tall, due to space limitations behind the panel (the Velocity with yokes has some major off-limits areas behind the panel for control linkages) but that would have consumed most of the panel width between the yokes themselves. So, now I am going back to a single stack, and will try to juggle things so that they all can fit. If not, the KX-195 comes out gets replaced with something thinner. On paper, it SHOULD all fit, so we will see.

latest challenges will be ensuring compatibility between the King radios and the ARC/Sperry nav indicators as well as building or buying the remote annunciators to allow IFR GPS approaches. Worst case scenario is leaving enough extra wire looped between the GPS and the indicator to allow it to have a relay/annunciator spliced in between them.

The whole reason for IFR capability (the VOR/LOC/GS/GPS combined with the Dynon EFIS) is partly a matter of convenience/preference: Its something that is important to me. Likewise its also about a security blanket from a situational awareness standpoint. Flight test is a VFR day event, but its nice to know that if the clouds or fog fill in below you, yer not totally screwed.

More than anything else, though, is the desire to not have to take the panel apart later to upgrade to this capability. Simple VFR instrumentation and radios would involve only a few wires - mainly power, speaker, headset and PTT. But for each nav/com, adding nav and ILS capability is a matter of nearly 20 wires. Adding DME is another 8-10. Each is a terminal on the back of a big plug. The nav may send 10 wires to a Glideslope reciever, another 5 or more to the indicator, a few more from the glideslope reciever to the indicator, and then the DME (if so equipped). Then theres your second nav tray (the KY-196), while the 196 is a com-com with a mechanical flip flop switch, it fits in a 175B tray, which can be pre-wired for nav. Later, a digital upgrade can be slid directly into the tray, in the form of an MX-170 from Michel, for about $1500 new.

Being pre-wired allows for less MAJOR work later. So.. for not a lot of initial cost, The velocity can have IFR abilities, and yours truly can finish his IFR rating right after flight test. Granted, the bird will never be a HARD IFR capable aircraft - precip static would give us a lot of headaches on the plastic airframe, since its not 100% electrically bonded, nor coated in conductive primer, but being able to drop through a layer, or having piece of mind in low vis or night settings is always a plus.

Next minor accomplishment: The IVO is temporarily mounted on the engine/PSRU combination. They currenly reside on a workstand, but I finished fabricating my first run at an "electric brush holder mount" that will bridge the PSRU hub and hold two carbon brushes against electrically isolated hub slices, which will permit an electric motor in the hub to vary blade pitch. Pictures to follow.

Third on my list: I am up to plan C on my primary fuel rail. Those who may recall, I am using the stock injector mounting location on the middle side housing for my primary fuel injectors and I originally planned to fab up a fuel rail to feed them. I took a stock rail, cut off the hose mount ends and planned to weld in steel AN fittings. Well, the welding never happened and I decided not to push it, so I grabbed a stock fuel rail with its metric hose fittings and tried to make it work. Well AN6, the size of my fuel hose, was too big. AN4 was too small, and I have yet to find an AN5 hose. I thought about building up the metric hose barbs with something (epoxy?) to increase their diameter, but good sense prevailed and I decided this was one place not to get too experimental. Plan C involves buying a fabricated compatible part for 80 bux from one of the RX7 speed shops online. This will permit me to use AN6 hoses and hardware to finish out the fuel system.

Also regarding fuel, I purchased two 1600 cc injectors new for use on the secondaries, but they are low impedance. There is an outfit in canada that sells resistor packs that are inline and adapt the low impedance injectors to hi-impedance drivers. Same outfit I bought my injector bosses from. Unfortunately, they are quirky: They dont use most shippers - a long list of folks they DONT use... and wont accept from.. and they wont take Mastercard.. VISA yes.. MC no. My last time ordering from them involved something on the order of 20-25 USD shipping and handling, involving an international postal money order. The 4 pack of resistors this time costs $25 USD and another $21 USD for shipping. You can view them at http://www.sdsefi.com/res4.jpg.

Well this time, I did some shopping and found the same resistors for $10.40 for the four of them from Mouser electronics, a domestic firm and got them as well as other do-dads for less than price of SDS's shipping alone. Part number is 284-HS25-7.5F for Mouser: 7.5 ohm 1% and 25 watts.

Other things arrived or enroute: I replaced our cast iron exhaust manifold (Greddy Style) with a Stone Racing stainless steel one. After I obtained the iron one, I came to realize that the cast iron was less than optimal for certain things, like welding or tapping it for bungs for EGT and 02 sensors. So, now the manifold is here, and fits a stock turbo flange... and the sensors are enroute.

Final bits of plumbing for the fuel system are on the way, as well as fittings for the hoses. I will come back after the fact and replace the initial hose runs with fire-sleeved material.

Still have some major wiring to undertake, but it will come together eventually, and I dont think engine start and taxi testing is too ambitious of a goal for the next few months.

Dave

Last edited by David Staten : 01-21-2006 at 09:01 AM.
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Old 01-21-2006, 09:01 AM
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John Slade John Slade is offline
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Hi Dave,
Sounds like you're making progress.
A couple of things jumped out at me when reading your update....

The injectors - 1600cc? Are you sure? All four of mine are stock 550cc injectors. You're not using just 2 are you?

Resistors. I have 2 low impedance injectors too. Tracy sells the resitors needed for about $25. These are quite big with an integral heat sink. While I was waiting for these I used 2 cheaper resistors from a local electronics store. They overheated.

You mentioned ind 380a and 381a heads. Do you mean 350a and 351a? I have a 350a and need a 351a.
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Old 01-21-2006, 09:32 AM
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David Staten David Staten is offline
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Location: KEFD, Houston Area, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Slade
Hi Dave,
Sounds like you're making progress.
A couple of things jumped out at me when reading your update....

The injectors - 1600cc? Are you sure? All four of mine are stock 550cc injectors. You're not using just 2 are you?

Resistors. I have 2 low impedance injectors too. Tracy sells the resitors needed for about $25. These are quite big with an integral heat sink. While I was waiting for these I used 2 cheaper resistors from a local electronics store. They overheated.

You mentioned ind 380a and 381a heads. Do you mean 350a and 351a? I have a 350a and need a 351a.
I have two used 550's from the old engines that I may or may not use. I've been leaning away from used fuel injectors since the results of the inquiry into Paul Connor's crash.

The 550's, if used, will be in the primary injector positions on the block. The 1600's will be on the secondary intake runners, and they are new. I may end up replacing the 550's with new before first flight, but not necessarily before first start.

The 550's are large enough to give decent performance at higher power settings but sensitive enough to idle low/slow. The 1600's will provide the brunt of the fuel flow at high power settings without worrying about approaching 80% duty cycle. This is with the anticipation of putting a turbo on in the near future.

The nav indicators are 380's... I have the IN-381A in hand, and the IN-380A is enroute. http://www.avionix.com/indicator.html is my resource thus far. The ones have look much newer than the ones depicted on the indicator page.

The resistors are about $2.40 apiece, and shipping for a small handful of items was $5 mouser. The key to the resistors is to ensure you properly heat sink em (on a small aluminum plate/base or something), otherwise they WILL overheat. 25 watts is a noticeable amount of heat to dissipate: touch a 20 watt light bulb for a demonstration.

Do you have the wiring diagram/pinouts for the indicator you have?

Dave
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Old 01-21-2006, 10:09 AM
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John Slade John Slade is offline
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Have you checked with Tracy on whether the EC2 can handle 1600's in the secondary? Seems like they'd need a very large adjustment of pulse width.

Sorry. I mis-spoke. I have a KI203. I'm looking for a 351a or, I guess, a 381a. I don't have pinouts for the 350/380 range. Maybe you can get them from Aeroelectric. I do have data on the Narco AT50A, though. Let me know if you need this.
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Old 01-22-2006, 12:20 AM
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David Staten David Staten is offline
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Location: KEFD, Houston Area, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Slade
Have you checked with Tracy on whether the EC2 can handle 1600's in the secondary? Seems like they'd need a very large adjustment of pulse width.

Sorry. I mis-spoke. I have a KI203. I'm looking for a 351a or, I guess, a 381a. I don't have pinouts for the 350/380 range. Maybe you can get them from Aeroelectric. I do have data on the Narco AT50A, though. Let me know if you need this.
Something I have heard and havent 100% verified is that the older NON-ARINC King radios like the KX-175 and perhaps your KNS 80 is that they may use different driving voltage to the needles on the indicator.. i want to say 300mv instead of 150 mv or vice versa.. older stuff was intentionally incompatible with other manufacturers until the ARINC standards came to the forefront.

So, make sure you dont need some sort of in-line resistor between the ARC indicator and the king Radio. I will be obtaining manuals (not just pinouts) on the stuff I have to make sure.

Dave
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