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  #1  
Old 09-18-2006, 10:45 AM
Wayne Hicks Wayne Hicks is offline
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Default Ch25: Contouring the Canard

As those who read my Chapter 25 Finishing pages know, I'm fanatical about using the 45-degree sanding pattern. The one exception is when contouring the top of the canard. Walk down the EZ flight line and rub your hand over the tops of canards. Feel that flat spot over the spar caps? There are two reasons for this: (1) not enough fill over the spar caps, and (2) too much sanding flat-spots the top of the canard.

I cured this by using the soon-to-be-patented Hicks Milling Machine. (But you can steal the idea if you want to.) I set up my canard on the lay-up table I used years ago using those "E" jigs used in Chapter 10. I used my smart level to level out the table and to position the canard on the "E" jigs with zero degrees incidence. Once I was sure of it, I bondoed the canard to the jigs so it won't move during contouring. I used a canard sanding block that I made specifically for this purpose. It is shaped to the exact Roncz airfoil. You use it by placing a strip of sticky-backed sanding paper onto the block, then sanding side to side with it along the span of the canard. At each corner of the sanding block are lag bolts that slide along the top of the table. The lag bolts allow you to use the sanding block like a milling machine.

As more and more of the micro is sanded off, you carefully screw the lag bolts in by an eighth of a turn to lower the sanding block. You keep screwing in the lag bolts and lowering the sanding block until you hit the high spots! In this manner, you can precisely shape the micro and ensure a very straight surface finish with precisely zero incidence (no twist).

While this approach sounds anal, it's very QUICK and very PRECISE! Alot quicker than spline sanding and stopping to measure the canard shape with little templates. It's almost fool proof.

(BTW: The last picture is obviously staged because I am not wearing my respirator.)
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  #2  
Old 09-18-2006, 11:08 AM
Phil Kriley Phil Kriley is offline
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Man I like the way you think! I've gotten more great ideas from you! Thanks, Wayne!
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  #3  
Old 09-26-2006, 09:30 AM
Hmanvel Hmanvel is offline
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Wayne - Excellent idea, probably alot of setup but well worth it. Did you use the plans template or did you somehow copy your own shape to do that? I would guess the templates in the plans would not necessarily agree with the net size of your canard after layups.
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Old 09-26-2006, 09:33 AM
Wayne Hicks Wayne Hicks is offline
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I used the G template, which is the one we use after the canard is glassed to set the incidence parallel to the top longerons. I also fudged it a little to take into account the thickness of my sticky-backed sanding paper. It's not 100%, but I believe I'm getting a better shape than if I had sanded by hand.
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  #5  
Old 09-26-2006, 03:22 PM
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This is the one thing that I feel need practice and patience. I see a lot of canard aircraft flat panels "waving goodbye" like a lot of ameture car restorers. This is a great idea for the first timers. The 4 foot sanding block is a good plan as well. Something to do before you begin - GET LOTS OF LIGHT! Put some flourescent lights on the walls as wel as the ceiling. You'll see the surface at different angles that will reveal bumps and joggles. Keep cleaning the surface and check and recheck. Walk around so you get all light reflection angles.
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Old 09-26-2006, 03:32 PM
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I saw Wayne's setup when he kindly allowed me to visit him at his hangar and had dinner with me so i did not have to dine alone, something i detest doing, and i think it is a good idea and I will be employing this method.

good stuff
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  #7  
Old 09-27-2006, 01:03 AM
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Steve parkins Steve parkins is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neverquit
This is the one thing that I feel need practice and patience. I see a lot of canard aircraft flat panels "waving goodbye" like a lot of amateur car restorers. This is a great idea for the first timers. The 4 foot sanding block is a good plan as well. Something to do before you begin - GET LOTS OF LIGHT! Put some fluorescent lights on the walls as well as the ceiling. You'll see the surface at different angles that will reveal bumps and joggles. Keep cleaning the surface and check and recheck. Walk around so you get all light reflection angles.
yes, but go for the wet look, it shows off more.
i use a body shop spray bottle, you add your cleaner, put lid on, add air. spray for a month or two, add more air. i use a wax and grease remover as to not hurt the plane
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  #8  
Old 09-28-2006, 02:16 AM
king Racer king Racer is offline
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I am in process of finishing a canard for my King Racer, and I used Burt Rutans/John Roncz's R1145M Long EZ Special Performance Canard Plans as per Shirl Dickey's plans (modifications).

I am wondering if the "finished" canard must have the "E" and "F" templates fit around the canard with points A & B just touching? Has anyone finished the canard without the points touching, and how much tolerance is there?

The length of my elevators are as per the Long EZ plans, but based on the King Racer fuselage, the elevator lengths must be slightly longer, or else possibly "optional" elevator root fairings must be used. If I extend my elevators, will the same elevator weight restrictions, posted on the Rutan Aircraft Factory (RAF) web site, still apply?
Has anyone had to lengthen their elevators or build "optional root fairings"?
Is there anywhere on the web where I could find information on how to complete a static load test on the canard?
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  #9  
Old 09-28-2006, 09:10 AM
Ben Ben is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by king Racer
If I extend my elevators, will the same elevator weight restrictions, posted on the Rutan Aircraft Factory (RAF) web site, still apply?
For what it's worth, the Cozy IV plans don't give a maximum weight for the elevators. They do say that you should be able to balance the elevators with the standard lead weights outlined. If you can't balance the elevator with these weights, you are instructed to rebuild the elevators. I would think that Shirl would have the answer to your question (I'd only trust him on this issue).
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  #10  
Old 09-28-2006, 09:25 AM
Wayne Hicks Wayne Hicks is offline
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I used Burt Rutans/John Roncz's R1145M Long EZ Special Performance Canard Plans as per Shirl Dickey's plans (modifications).

----> Yes, we simply call it the Roncz canard. That's opposed to the GU canard (Glasgow University) originally spec'd for the Long-EZ.

I am wondering if the "finished" canard must have the "E" and "F" templates fit around the canard with points A & B just touching?

-----> I couldn't get mine to touch either. Other builders have reported the same "no touch" thing. Just ensure the upper surface and lower surface contours match the templates. Shape is critical.

Has anyone had to lengthen their elevators or build "optional root fairings"?

-----> The Cozy IV elevators are built long then cut to fit the fuselage. We don't lengthen them. You really want your elevators to be long enough to be within one inch or so of the fuselage. If you must lengthen them, then do so. Just ensure they balance correctly (for flutter concerns).

Is there anywhere on the web where I could find information on how to complete a static load test on the canard?

----> I'm curious, why? You must distribute the shot bags correctly for the load test to have real meaning. RAF once loaded a non-airworthy canard to 13.2 g's before it failed. The second GU canard twisted at or above 16 g's and all the shot bags fell off. Take a look at the complete story, "Testing a Canard to Failure", can be found at this link.
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  #11  
Old 09-29-2006, 12:46 AM
king Racer king Racer is offline
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Thanks, I appreciate the information. I built my canard as per the plans, but I considered testing it to satisfy my own curiosity. I think I'll skip the static load test.
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  #12  
Old 09-29-2006, 01:39 AM
eracer113 eracer113 is offline
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King Racer
Forget about the canard testing, it has already been done by Burt Rutan and is unneccesary. Build per Shirls plans and you will have no problems. I have an E Racer and I have about a two inch fairing at the fuselage, looks great and no bad habits. Elevator balance is critical on canard AC, make sure you build them correct and you should have no problems.

Jack
E Racer 113
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  #13  
Old 09-30-2006, 01:30 PM
king Racer king Racer is offline
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Thanks for the help eracer113 . You saved me a lot of head scratching

Tom
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  #14  
Old 10-02-2006, 01:24 PM
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I was discussing this topic at RR this weekend. It seems there's quite a variety of elevator farings out there along with no farings at all. I got my elevators snug to the fuse like Nat's. It was brought up the only thing to be concience of is to make enough clearance for possible ice forming.
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  #15  
Old 10-02-2006, 02:00 PM
Wayne Hicks Wayne Hicks is offline
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Some people purposely leave a gap between the elevators and the fuselage to keep the elevtors from scratching the fuselage sides when installing the canard.
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